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January 07, 2007

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Comments

Dr mirrafati

i never think this way really it is strange but true

Smertebehandling

Good post, thanks for sharing it.

David

great post! truly not enough info and pics out there on the web about truly fantastic facial hair, well done.

Ben

Thanks for the information Tim.

GreenmanTim

The origin of neckties was military. The French "cravate" is a corruption of "Croat" and refers to the neckwear of Croatian mercenaries supporting the French King Louis XIII. The French adopted the new fashion, and Charles II brought it to Britain on his return to power following Parliamentary period. The period of evolution from the cravat to the "tie" took place between the late seventeeth century and the early 19th.

I suspect we keep the fashion today because the long, perpendicular necktie has a slimming effect breaking up the broad expanse of white shirted belly...

Bev

I wonder if ties were originally phallic symbols or substitute beards? What was the origin of ties?

GreenmanTim

Dan, I had heard something along those lines and so went to the source. No less an authority than Donald B. Kraybill's THE RIDDLE OF AMISH CULTURE confirms the military association of the mustache and further reveals:

"Sideburns without a beard are prohibited for members. Men shave until marriage, at which time they grow a beard, which serves the symbolic function of a wedding ring in the larger culture and as a rite of passage to manhood as well. Single men over forty also grow a beard. An untrimmed, full beard from ear to ear is encouraged for adult men; however, many trim their beards for neatness. The upper lip is shaved even after marriage because the mustache, once associated with European military officers, is forbidden by the church." (pgs. 63-65)

Dan Trabue

On a related note, are you familiar with the reason for the Amish beard-but-no-moustache look? It is because at some point (Civil War period?) the style for soldiers was to have a moustache alone. Thus, the opposite of the soldier would be the beard with no moustache.

Or at least that's what I've heard.

GreenmanTim

Ah, yes, there is a live witness to my denuded face. Summer of 1988. What was I thinking? There are photos from that whale watch we took with your folks at the end of August that reveal the whole, sordid thing, but unless you have copies, frumiousb, they will never see the light of day on this blog! With some mysteries, to quote Nigel Tufnel; "best leave it...unsolved."

One of the whales photographed by your father on that trip does appear in a post from this summer to illustrate a subsequent excursion: http://greensleeves.typepad.com/berkshires/2006/07/thar_she_breach.html

frumiousb

Oh dear, I remember when you shaved. It was traumatic for everyone, as I recall.

Some people just belong in beards.

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